‘Concerning’ gonorrhea strain detected in Massachusetts

State health officials say a “concerning” strain of gonorrhea with a reduced response to antibiotics has been detected in Massachusetts. Two cases of the sexually transmitted bacterial infection were eventually successfully cured, but health officials said that the novel strain was only previously seen in Asia -Pacific countries and in the United Kingdom.”This is the first time that resistance or reduced response to five classes of antibiotics has been identified in gonorrhea in the United States,” the Department of Public Health wrote in a statement.If left untreated, gonorrhea can result in pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, and other health problems. Following the detection of this strain, DPH said it was working with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and local health care providers to expand testing of gonorrhea specimens for evidence of this strain in other patients.Video below: Why are infection rates for some STDs at an all-time high?DPH also issued an alert to clinicians and laboratories to inform them of the new strain. “The discovery of this strain of gonorrhea is a serious public health concern which DPH, the CDC, and other health departments have been vigilant about detecting in the US,” said Public Health Commissioner Margret Cooke. “We urge all sexually active people to be regularly tested for sexually transmitted infections and to consider reducing the number of their sexual partners and increasing their use of condoms when having sex. Clinicians are advised to review the clinical alert and assist with our expanded surveillance efforts .”DPH said cases of gonorrhea are on the rise in Massachusetts and nationally. “In Massachusetts, laboratory-confirmed cases of gonorrhea have increased 312% since a low point of 1,976 cases in 2009 to 8,133 in 2021. Nationally, confirmed cases have risen by 131% between 2009 and 2021, with 696,764 cases reported in the US in 2021 according to preliminary data released by the CDC,” DPH wrote.

State health officials say a “concerning” strain of gonorrhea with a reduced response to antibiotics has been detected in Massachusetts.

Two cases of the sexually transmitted bacterial infection were eventually successfully cured, but health officials said that the novel strain was only previously seen in Asia-Pacific countries and in the United Kingdom.

“This is the first time that resistance or reduced response to five classes of antibiotics has been identified in gonorrhea in the United States,” the Department of Public Health wrote in a statement.

If left untreated, gonorrhea can result in pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, and other health problems.

Following the detection of this strain, DPH said it was working with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and local health care providers to expand testing of gonorrhea specimens for evidence of this strain in other patients.

Video below: Why are infection rates for some STDs at an all-time high?

DPH also issued an alert to clinicians and laboratories to inform them of the new strain.

“The discovery of this strain of gonorrhea is a serious public health concern which DPH, the CDC, and other health departments have been vigilant about detecting in the US,” said Public Health Commissioner Margret Cooke. “We urge all sexually active people to be regularly tested for sexually transmitted infections and to consider reducing the number of their sexual partners and increasing their use of condoms when having sex. Clinicians are advised to review the clinical alert and assist with our expanded surveillance efforts .”

DPH said cases of gonorrhea are on the rise in Massachusetts and nationally.

“In Massachusetts, laboratory-confirmed cases of gonorrhea have increased 312% since a low point of 1,976 cases in 2009 to 8,133 in 2021. Nationally, confirmed cases have risen by 131% between 2009 and 2021, with 696,764 cases reported in the US in 2021 according to preliminary data released by the CDC,” DPH wrote.

.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: