Keller tells library to remove social media banned books post


The Keller public library on Monday posted a list of banned and challenged books on social media, but the city asked the library to remove the post out of concern that it would spark controversy among residents.

The Keller public library on Monday posted a list of banned and challenged books on social media, but the city asked the library to remove the post out of concern that it would spark controversy among residents.

yyossifor@star-telegram.com

Some Keller residents were concerned Monday when they saw that the city asked the public library to remove a social media post promoting the national Banned Books Week.

The library posted a tweet that said, “National Banned Books Week is September 18-September 24.

“Want to check out any of these titles for yourself? Your Keller Public Library card can help you with that!”

Some of the books from the 10 most challenged of 2021 listed are “Gender Queer,” by Maia Kobabe, “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian,” by Sherman Alexie and “Me and Earl and the Dying Girl,” by Jesse Andrews.

The library’s post also listed reasons why the books were challenged or banned which included references to the LGBTQ community, sexually explicit content and derogatory terms.

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The Keller public library posted a message on social media Monday promoting the 10 most challenged books of 2021, but the city asked the library to remove the post out of fear of controversy. Twitter

Debbie Wolf, a Keller resident who spoke during Tuesday night’s council meeting, said she was concerned that the library was told to remove the post.

“In February of this year, I asked the city council to publicly condemn racist, anti-Semitic material distributed within parts of the city by the Aryan Freedom Network,” she said. “No condemnation was forthcoming. Yesterday, the city removed a Facebook post from our public library about Banned Books Week, which included a list of the most challenged books this year, a list the library has shared many times in years past.”

In a statement sent to the Star-Telegram via text message, the city of Keller said it told the library to take down the social media post out of concern that it could spark controversy in the community.

“City leadership was concerned that residents would think we were trying to cause controversy, given recent debates about books in the school district, so we removed it as that was certainly not the intent,” the text message read.

“We still invite our residents to celebrate Banned Books Week with us at the library this week, as we do every year.”

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The Keller public library removed the social media post Monday after the city was concerned it would spark controversy. Twitter

This story was originally published September 20, 2022 10:38 PM.

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With my guide dog Barbara, I keep tabs on growth, economic development and other issues in Northeast Tarrant cities and other communities near Fort Worth. I’ve been a reporter at the Star-Telegram for 34 years.

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