Banksy urges fans to go and STEAL from Guess in Regent Street for using his art without permission

Secretive graffiti artist Banksy has urged fans to go and ‘help themselves’ to clothes from GUESS on Regent Street after the shop used his artwork without permission.

In a post to his 11.5 million followers on Instagram, the reclusive artist called out for shoplifters to give the clothing brand a taste of their own medicine.

‘Attention all shoplifters.

‘Please go to GUESS on Regent Street. They’ve helped themselves to my artwork without asking, how can it be wrong for you to do the same to their clothes?’

Social media users were quick to support the artist.

The anonymous graffiti artist encouraged fans on Instagram to steal clothes from the Regent Street shop. Banksy has had a number of trademarks removed in recent years after refusing to publicly reveal his identity

One user said: ‘The NERVE to say ‘with graffiti by Banksy.’

Others described the brand’s use of the artist’s image as ’embarrassing’ and some users pledged to visit the store.

The GUESS X Brandalised collection was unveiled earlier this month and mixes ‘Banksy’s graffiti with “Guess attitude”‘.

Brandalised says it offers licenses to the world’s most famous graffiti and works with brands including HUAWEI and Eleven Paris.

This is not the first time that the graffiti artist, known for his clever satirical designs, has run into copyright problems.

The artist was stripped of copyright for the Flower Thrower artwork – the one used by the GUESS store – in 2020, after a two-year legal battle with card firm Full Color Black.

The Radar Rat is one of Banksy's most famous images (file image)

Banksy has had a number of trademarks removed in recent years after refusing to publicly reveal his identity, including for popular image, Girl With Umbrella (file image)

Artist Banksy has lost trademarks on Radar Rat and Girl With Umbrella after refusing to reveal his identity. He was accused by judges of ‘acting in bad faith’

The shop has used the Flower Thrower as part of its GUESS x Brandalised collection.  The artist disputes its usage and has encouraged fans to steal clothes from the store

The shop has used the Flower Thrower as part of its GUESS x Brandalised collection. The artist disputes its usage and has encouraged fans to steal clothes from the store

The artist has never revealed his identity, although The Mail on Sunday named him as former public schoolboy Robin Gunningham

The artist has never revealed his identity, although The Mail on Sunday named him as former public schoolboy Robin Gunningham

Banksy refused to reveal his identity to judges who refused to uphold his copyright to the image because, ‘he cannot be identified as the unquestionable owner of such works as his identity is hidden’.

The anonymous street artist was stripped of three more trademarks in 2021, for Radar Rat, Laugh Now and Girl With Umbrella, taking the number of trademarks lost to four.

Banksy was told he was ‘acting in bad faith’ by remaining anonymous. He had previously said ‘copyright is for losers’.

Banksy was named by The Mail on Sunday as former public schoolboy Robin Gunningham, although his identity has never been confirmed.

Has Banksy been spotted in Ukraine? Video shows mystery masked figure ‘painting’ mural confirmed to be artwork by elusive artist

By CHRIS PLEASANCE FOR MAILONLINE

Elusive British street artist Banksy may have been ‘caught’ painting a mural on a destroyed building in Ukraine.

CCTV footage doing the rounds on Ukrainian TikTok shows a mask-wearing man sneaking up to a wall in the city of Irpin, near Kyiv, before ‘painting’ on it.

While the footage appears to be a heavily staged spoof, it is possible it still shows Banksy – whose true identity has never been revealed.

The Irpin artwork, which shows a ballerina in a neck-brace, has been confirmed as a genuine Banksy and is one of seven he has painted in Ukraine in recent days.

The idea of ​​spoofing a video of himself being ‘caught’ is in keeping with Banksy’s mischievous sense of humour.

Staged CCTV footage doing the rounds on Ukrainian TikTok shows a man sneaking up to a wall in the city of Irpin before 'painting' a Banksy on it

Staged CCTV footage doing the rounds on Ukrainian TikTok shows a man sneaking up to a wall in the city of Irpin before ‘painting’ a Banksy on it

While the footage is heavily staged and the painting is obviously not happening live, it is still possible the British street artist spoofed it himself - in keeping with his sense of humor

While the footage is heavily staged and the painting is obviously not happening live, it is still possible the British street artist spoofed it himself – in keeping with his sense of humor

The Irpin artwork - showing a ballerina in a neck-brace - has been confirmed as a genuine Banksy and is one of seven painted in Ukraine in recent days

The Irpin artwork – showing a ballerina in a neck-brace – has been confirmed as a genuine Banksy and is one of seven painted in Ukraine in recent days

Other works painted by Banksy in Ukraine include a man in a bathtub – who bears a passing resemblance to Charles Darwin – painted inside a destroyed apartment in Horenka, a village five miles north-east of Irpin.

Another painted on the walls of a destroyed school in the town of Borodyanka, west of Irpin, shows a child flipping an adult man onto his back in a judo match.

The male figure appears to be Vladimir Putin – who holds a judo back belt.

More works include a mobile missile launcher that incorporates a crude drawing of a penis where the rocket should be, children playing on a tank trap as if it were a see-saw, and a woman in hair curlers and a gas mask holding a fire extinguisher .

Banksy confirmed their authenticity in a video released on his Instagram account, entitled ‘in solidarity with the people of Ukraine’.

Included in the footage is a woman and her daughter outside the bombed-out school, after the judo mural had been painted.

She says: ‘It was a bomb here and many people died.

‘My child used to go to this kindergarten. Don’t cry honey, we already cried so much, we don’t have any tears left.’

An artwork confirmed to be by Banksy on a street in Kyiv shows a Russian missile launcher with a crudely drawn penis in place of the rocket

An artwork confirmed to be by Banksy on a street in Kyiv shows a Russian missile launcher with a crudely drawn penis in place of the rocket

Another of Banksy's Ukraine artworks shows a woman with hair curlers and a robe on, wearing a gas mask and holding a fire extinguisher near a burned-out building

Another of Banksy’s Ukraine artworks shows a woman with hair curlers and a robe on, wearing a gas mask and holding a fire extinguisher near a burned-out building

Painted on the wall of a nursery destroyed by a Russian bomb, this Banksy shows a child throwing a man who resembles Putin in a judo match - a sport in which he has a black belt

Painted on the wall of a nursery destroyed by a Russian bomb, this Banksy shows a child throwing a man who resembles Putin in a judo match – a sport in which he has a black belt

Banksy began his unconventional artistic career as a graffiti artist in Bristol in the 1990s, and came to prominence painting satirical, political murals on buildings.

His signature style became black and white portraits painted using stencils, often showing human or animal figures performing an action or interacting with the world around them.

Some of his most well-known works oppose conflict, including a portrait of a man hurling a bouquet of flowers – painted on the West Bank Wall which separates Jerusalem from Israel.

He is also known for playing with the idea of ​​fake vs real.

During a residency in New York in 2013 he set up what appeared to be a tourist-trap stall in Central Park selling what seemed like replicas of his work for $60 a piece.

Except that the stall was real, and the artworks were genuine.

Despite being in place for a full day, just one customer bought two prints which later raised in excess of $100,000 when sold at auction.

Another piece that toyed with a similar idea and the value of art was a print of ‘Girl With Balloon’ that partially shredded itself while being auctioned.

The half-destroyed artwork later went back on auction, and sold for many times its initial guide price.

Another of Banksy's new artworks in Ukraine shows a man who bears a passing resemblance to Charles Darwin having a bath in a destroyed house

Another of Banksy’s new artworks in Ukraine shows a man who bears a passing resemblance to Charles Darwin having a bath in a destroyed house

A dancer also features in this piece by Banksy, painted in the town of Borodyanka, which shows the female figure balancing on top of rubble

A dancer also features in this piece by Banksy, painted in the town of Borodyanka, which shows the female figure balancing on top of rubble

Two children appear to be playing on a tank trap as if on a see-saw in this Banksy work, which appeared in downtown Kyiv

Two children appear to be playing on a tank trap as if on a see-saw in this Banksy work, which appeared in downtown Kyiv

Banksy’s Ukraine artworks appeared in cities and towns devastated by Russia’s nine-month long war in Ukraine.

Irpin, where the ballerina with the neck brace appeared, was the site of some of the worst atrocities committed by Putin’s troops.

Hundreds of civilians were massacred during a months-long occupation after Russian forces were stopped there while trying to advance on Kyiv.

When Putin’s troops retreated they left behind evidence of their war crimes, including mass graves, torture chambers, and civilian bodies lying in the streets.

Ukraine is continuing to drive back the Kremlin’s troops on the battlefield, with recent retreats coming in the south and north-east.

Russian forces fled from the area around Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second-largest city, in September and recently withdrew from the city of Kherson.

Around half of the territory occupied by Moscow’s armies at the peak of the invasion has now been recaptured, with Kyiv asking for more weapons to get the job done.

At the top of the list are anti-aircraft batteries to protect against increased Russia air strikes, but Ukraine also wants attack jets and tanks to help with its offensives.

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